Tuesday, November 29, 2005

News - Avian flu fears put to rest - News

The avian influenza or bird flu has recently surfaced in the media as a possible pandemic disease, resulting in a fear of global outbreak.
Originating in chicken production in southeast Asian countries such as China, Indonesia and Cambodia, the disease is a common virus in both domestic and migratory birds, which when passed on to humans acts similar to the common influenza virus, but more aggressively, sometimes resulting in death.
It was because of the transfer to humans in early 1997, 2003, and now in 2005 that the government has been taking precautions to prevent another Severe Accute Respitory Syndrome (SARS) or Mad Cow type of outbreak.

Thus far there have been no humans infected in North America, but because of the ever increasing number of trans-Pacific travellers, the disease has become a serious threat for Canada, the United States and the rest of the world.
The scare has caused many precautions to be set in place and has even alarmed the general public of possible infection. So far in southeast Asian countries there have been approximately 100 proven cases and over half of those people have died as a result of the disease.
Specializing in the patterns of infectious disease, Health Sciences Associate Professor Ana Sanchez said that, "The SARS outbreak has shown us a big lesson in staying complacent ? it was a real eye opener, but because of it we are stronger in that area. We still have work to do, but it was a start."
The Canadian government has taken extreme precaution in dealing with chicken production but some officials say that it has gone a little too far.
This can be argued by the fact that precautions are taken to prevent such outbreaks, like SARS, and that as Professor Sanchez stated, "We are trying to send an international message that we are doing what is required to protect the nation and the world."

Avian flu fears put to rest - News: "The avian influenza or bird flu has recently surfaced in the media as a possible pandemic disease, resulting in a fear of global outbreak.
Originating in chicken production in southeast Asian countries such as China, Indonesia and Cambodia, the disease is a common virus in both domestic and migratory birds, which when passed on to humans acts similar to the common influenza virus, but more aggressively, sometimes resulting in death.
It was because of the transfer to humans in early 1997, 2003, and now in 2005 that the government has been taking precautions to prevent another Severe Accute Respitory Syndrome (SARS) or Mad Cow type of outbreak.
Thus far there have been no humans infected in North America, but because of the ever increasing number of trans-Pacific travellers, the disease has become a serious threat for Canada, the United States and the rest of the world.
The scare has caused many precautions to be set in place and has even alarmed the general public of possible infection. So far in southeast Asian countries there have been approximately 100 proven cases and over half of those people have died as a result of the disease.
Specializing in the patterns of infectious disease, Health Sciences Associate Professor Ana Sanchez said that, 'The SARS outbreak has shown us a big lesson in staying complacent ? it was a real eye opener, but because of it we are stronger in that area. We still have work to do, but it was a start.'
The Canadian government has taken extreme precaution in dealing with chicken production but some officials say that it has gone a little too far.
This can be argued by the fact that precautions are taken to prevent such outbreaks, like SARS, and that as Pro"

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