Tuesday, December 20, 2005

News - Avian influenza H5N1 detection kits set to launch: News from Applied Biosystems

Kits detect the viral H5 subtype including H5N1 in human and animal samples in less than two hours; set for release for research and epidemiological use now and will be broadly available early in 2006

Applied Biosystems's TaqMan Influenza A/H5 Detection Kits, which detect the viral H5 subtype, including H5N1, in human and animal samples in less than two hours, are set for release to select laboratories around the world for research and epidemiological use before the end of 2005 and will be broadly available early in 2006. The detection kit, which is currently being tested and optimised against viral samples from the Hong Kong outbreaks of avian flu, is designed to run using standardised protocols on the Applied Biosystems real-time PCR system, and is part of a comprehensive package of technologies from Applied Biosystems for public health officials and researchers involved in the evaluation and surveillance of H5N1 avian influenza outbreaks. The package also includes standardised genome sequencing protocols and technology, ongoing genetic sequence information from the virus and access to a global influenza genome database.

The analysis software will also be made available through non-exclusive licenses and laboratories using Applied Biosystems's sequencing platform will be encouraged to submit influenza genome sequence information to the Los Alamos National Library (LANL) Influenza Sequence Database, GenBank, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) sequence database, or other publicly accessible databases, to ensure maximal sharing of scientific information.

Avian influenza H5N1 detection kits set to launch: News from Applied Biosystems

1 Comments:

At 10:52 PM, Blogger Avian Flu said...

H5N1 mutagenic shift as opposed to genetic drift will make this test useless. More important, the test is invasive rendering it less than practical for analysis in first responder situations.

H5N1 is is unusual in having a large proportion of amino acid substitutions in all gene products except in the surface genes. The theory is that H5N1 influenza virus might be a reassortant.

A reassortant virus genome combines genetic material from genotypically distinct viruses of the same viral species, resulting in a variant having certain desired antigenicity or attenuated virulence characteristics.

more at: http://h5n1-pandemic.blogspot.com

 

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